"Love is that liquor sweet and most divine, Which my God feels as blood; but I, as wine."

- George Herbert
Tim Tebow Uses Words At All Times Because They're Necessary

I like me some Kurt Warner (as a person -- my football loyalties always laid elsewhere, esp. when he and his Rams devastated my Titans in the Super Bowl), but I didn't like his recent advice to Tim Tebow:

I’d tell him, "Put down the boldness in regards to the words, and keep living the way you’re living. Let your teammates do the talking for you. Let them cheer on your testimony."
The idea behind this and other counsel to young master Tebow to lighten up on the Jesus talk is that talking about Jesus turns people off, so one should just be a good person instead. I've now seen both Christians and non-Christians suggest this approach.

There are a few problems with this advice:
1. It assumes Tim isn't already "being a good person."
2. It assumes one can simply imply the gospel with actions and it be understood.
3. It assumes that the gospel isn't offensive, really, but is made so through verbalizing it too much.

All of those assumptions are incorrect. Clearly for Tebow (who I respect and appreciate as a person -- my football loyalties lay elsewhere :-) which is a good thing since even though "he just wins," he's not a very good quarterback (yet?)) speaking the gospel and demonstrating its implications is not an either/or proposition. He rightly understands you cannot do one without the other.

I listened to a guest on Jim Rome's ESPN2 show yesterday say Tebow would commend his message more if he stopped talking about it and simply became a good football player. What all these folks appear to be saying is this: "Tebow turns people off by talking about his message so much." But what my ears hear is this: "Tebow's message makes me really uncomfortable and I don't like it, so I wish he'd just shut up and 'be nice'."

In fact, the Rome guest used the words "shoving it in our face," which is what offended parties often say about people who actually don't shove anything in anybody's face but merely talk most about what's most important to them. Last I heard, Tebow was not randomly showing up at people's homes and workplaces and cornering them with an evangelistic appeal. People are asking him questions, requesting interviews, wanting to hear what he has to say. And what Tebow has to say is directly influenced by the most direct influence on his life. Shouldn't this be true of everyone who claims Christ saved them?

What most of us seem ill-equipped to understand is a public figure so enamored with the love of Jesus he won't shut up about it. May his tribe increase, I say.

Tebow is apparently not the kind of star interested in paying Jesus some lip service when he wins a game or award. He's apparently a guy whose mouth is connected to the overflow of his heart.

The truth is that the gospel is a scandal. I wish brothers like Kurt Warner would factor that into their consideration. That people are blanching at Tebow's Christ-centered words is not because Tebow is offensive but because Christ is.

The truth is that faith comes by hearing, not by deducing through comfortable apprehension of good deeds. An implied gospel is a gospel fail.

(Oh, and that quote often attributed to St. Francis -- "Preach the gospel at all times; if necessary use words"? Yeah, he didn't say that. Or believe it.)

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Comments on "Tim Tebow Uses Words At All Times Because They're Necessary":
1. Bill - 12/02/2011 8:28 am CST

What most of us seem ill-equipped to understand is a public figure so enamored with the love of Jesus he won't shut up about it. May his tribe increase, I say.

Amen!

The truth is that the gospel is a scandal. I wish brothers like Kurt Warner would factor that into their consideration. That people are blanching at Tebow's Christ-centered words is not because Tebow is offensive but because Christ is.

Well said.

You've said so flawlessly in one post about a football player what I've been trying, and failing, to express for years around here, on lots of topics related to art, music, public figures, etc. I guess that's why you're the writer ;-)

Great post, Jared!

2. Brian - 12/02/2011 8:52 am CST

Great, great post! I had to have a discussion with our 15y old son last night, who is a QB (a better one than Tebow I might add) and greatly admires Tebow.

I absolutely appreciate what Tebow says, for yes what pours from his mouth is the overflow of what is in his heart...and praise be only to God for that. What I had to discuss with the boy last night, was what Tebow is doing when he does his "Tebowing". When Tebow is seen kneeling on the sidelines appearing to pray, with every camera and I'm sure many stadium eyes on him, he is drawing attention to himself, and not the One who died on the cross for him.

Tebow, stop the "Tebowing", pray with your team after the game, continue to glorify God and communicate The Gospel every opportunity you are given in interviews or in conversations with your teammates and coaches. On the field of play for those 4 qtrs, glorify God by using the ability he has given you and the opportunity he has given you, to the uttermost giving all you are to fulfill his purpose.

3. salguod - 12/02/2011 11:53 am CST

Brian - While I see your point, another way to look at it is that because he's pretty good, he's going to attract attention to himself. By praying publicly and obviously he's attempting to divert some of that attention away from himself and to God. If he didn't, the talk during the game would be all about him and his performance, at least some is now about God.

4. Newman - 12/02/2011 1:12 pm CST

My problem with Tebow is not that he's willing to talk about Jesus on camera, but that he sends the message - intentionally or not - that God is somehow advancing His Kingdom through football games. God can and does use just about everything for His purposes. But I don't think God cares who wins football games very much. There are devout believers on the teams that lose to the Broncos. Next time the Broncos lose, I hope someone comes up and says, "Well I love Jesus a lot too, and I guess this time He picked me and not Tim." Sounds ridiculous, but not anymore ridiculous than thinking that winning football games has much of anything to do with eternity.

5. nhe - 12/02/2011 2:57 pm CST

Jared....you know I always agree with you (at least I hope you do). However, we just spent an hour in our mens' group talking about Tebow (and Warner's response).........so I've had some time to think on this, and I'm not quite with ya.

I will first wholeheartedly agree that Jesus is the scandalon and the gospel is offensive, and much of the "backlash" is because this is true......if we hold back, the rocks will cry out - I'm with ya on that.

But, here's what I think Warner was alluding to, though maybe he didn't say it all that well...

First, Warner admits in the article that he was one of the chief offenders (back in his early NFL days) in doing what he is calling out Tebow for - which I found interesting. I certainly remember cringing at some of Warner's post game interviews. Warner has been in Tebow's shoes, with not quite the fan-fair, but he's a Super Bowl winning QB, so he has the pedigree with which to speak. Warner's default mode was and still is to be a proclaimer - I don't think he's gone soft, I just think he's grown up a tad.

Second, here's my biggest issue with Tebow's "style" - I don't mind the words as much as how and when he chooses them. I had the same problem with Warner in the 90's. Example - after Tebow beat the Jets a few weeks ago on a Thursday night, Deion Sanders asked Tebow in the post-game interview "how in the world did you go 90 yards down the field in 90 seconds on the Jets defense?"......Tebow's answer - "first of all, I'd like to thank my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, etc"........I'm sorry but if you're going to represent Jesus in the best possible way in that moment, the most honoring thing you can do is ANSWER THE QUESTION!!!!!

I think that when Christians with a media platform (be it at the Grammy Awards, or in a post-game interview) proclaim Jesus in response to a direct and unrelated question, it's off-putting and kind of distracting.

It's not only off-putting because the gospel is offensive (which I have no problem with) it's also off-putting because the majority of the world is tuning in to hear them answer the question. When they don't, they look silly.

The same was true when Susan Sarandon used her Oscar appearance to go off on the president. That's not what she's there for. She's there to humbly except an award and give a nice, thankful speech.

When Tebow is interviewed after the game, he's there to represent Christ by being gracious, deferential, and humble.....and to answer directly to questions that are asked. If there's an opportunity to work in a gospel nugget and proclaim Christ, go for it!....but understand the situation better.

6. Patrick - 12/02/2011 3:11 pm CST

The message of the cross is the power of God unto salvation. Most religions teach good deeds. Yes, faith without works is dead, but Christianity without words is fatalism. When the 5,000 and the 3,000 came to faith in Christ in the book of Acts, it wasn't because of Peter's pristine character and lifestyle, it was because they were cut to the heart by a message of repentance from sin and faith in Jesus Christ.

7. Quaid - 12/02/2011 5:22 pm CST

While this is probably not too different from nhe's first main point, the only reason I cut Warner any slack, whatsoever, is that he may have found it more profitable to evangelize those in the NFL in other ways. Warner is a believer with plenty of experience, and may have, therefore, a better understanding of Tebow's mission field.

At the end of the day, though, the wild card is the Holy Spirit. And if He is leading Tebow to speak (and pray?) in such a way, who is anyone to criticize? Certainly, those who have the same Spirit should know better.

Personally, if I can't find anything theologically wrong with what he's saying or doing, the last thing that Tim Tebow needs is me, or any other Christian for that matter, telling him how he ought to minister to others. He hasn't misrepresented Christ, as far as I can tell. Until he does, (and even after then) may God give Tim the wisdom and strength to carry out the mission. And if he does, let us all gently restore him - I actually think that Tebow would listen to correction when it comes to theology.

There are plenty of newsmakers masquerading as Christians who deserve far more guff than being thrown at Tebow right now. And there are certainly plenty of misrepresentations of Christ that we must confront in our very own communities to worry about someone who seems to have it right. For those believers ready to criticize Tebow, first check out that massive plank in your eye.

8. Quaid - 12/02/2011 5:38 pm CST

OK - I got a little bit preachy and melodramatic there. Sorry about that . . .

I just think we should all leave him alone until he does or says something worth criticizing.

9. Bill - 12/02/2011 6:41 pm CST

Quaid, well said.

For my part, when I become even half as bold as Tebow, and quit COMPLETELY MISSING opportunities to talk about Jesus because it makes me uncomfortable or I'm worried about what people think or basically being the worthless coward that I am . . . At that point, I'll feel qualified to criticize a brother who's speaking out.

(note: that's just me. I know what I said may come across wrong, judgmental, passive-agressive, etc. It's not - this is all directed at me. This is something that I struggle with. Has nothing to do with any of the other commenters on this post).

10. G. Frederick - 12/02/2011 8:11 pm CST

Excellent post. "(Oh, and that quote often attributed to St. Francis -- "Preach the gospel at all times; if necessary use words"? Yeah, he didn't say that. Or believe it.)" You know I always heard that was from Mother Theresa even have seen bumper stickers attributing it to her.

11. CaseyRAWR - 12/02/2011 9:49 pm CST

I recently read that article by Kurt and found it upsetting. Thank you for helping me articulate my thoughts in a handy link I can copy/paste!

12. nhe - 12/03/2011 6:35 am CST

Bill - I don't know if you directed any of that at me.....but I don't think you come across judgmental.

Another thought I had is that "too whom much is given, much is required". Tebow has been given a gigantic platform......and for the most part, he has done an awesome job with it.

I just believe that, sometimes, people with this kind of platform err on the side of taking a shortcut to having impact. It would be much more difficult for Tebow to press into the lives of his teammates and look for opportunities regularly to share Christ with them. I wouldn't be surprised if he was doing this. But this is the much harder way....there is a sense in which its a little easier to spout off about Jesus publicly - you might get criticized, but you don't have to get messy in people's lives.

If Tebow is doing both - that's awesome. I'm just suggesting that he look for better timing on the public stage, and that he focus his evangelistic efforts on the lives and narratives of the people in his immediate circle. That requires more effort....and its ok that we don't necessarily hear about it - it has more impact in the end - IMHO.

There is also a sense in which I think that whenever the rainbow hair guy shows John 3:16 in the end zone, or whenever Tebow leads off an interview with praise to Jesus, that Christians applaud, and non-Christians tune out mentally.....and I began to wonder if that really amounts to much.

However, I do also 100% agree with Quaid that the HS is the wildcard.

13. Karl - 12/03/2011 8:54 am CST

I'm with nhe. It's one thing for the gospel itself to be offensive. If that is what is putting people off, then so be it. But it's another thing to put people off because in our zeal to proclaim the gospel, we ourselves are abrasive or offensive or immature.

There is a woman in our couple's home group who came to Christ a few years back. She will now tell you that she wishes she could go back and have a do-over with her parents and siblings, and many of the friends she grew up with back home. She knows that in her zeal to convert them all, she isolated them and has damaged many relationships. Not because "the gospel is offensive" but because she was pushy and insensitive and in your face and wouldn't shut up.

Now I'm not saying Tebow is making the exact same mistakes my friend did. I think nhe got a big part of the Tebow deal for me - answer the interviewer's questions, dude. With public displays of piety there is also an element for me of "go in your closet and pray quietly." The whole deal with Jesus telling people not to parade their devotion to God before men, and the way Daniel didn't flout his devotion to God out in the public streets - the king's other advisors had to go and spy on him to confirm that he was still regularly praying to his God. If you are asked about your faith - be ready with an answer. If you see a natural opening to share your faith, take it. But please don't shoehorn it in when people really want to know something else.

I like Tebow and root for him. I'm not all up in arms about his public displays of devotion and piety. But since the question was raised and a viewpoint expressed, I thought I'd chime in with my two cents seconding what nhe is saying.

14. nhe - 12/03/2011 10:16 am CST

nicely put Karl......and I think we're both saying that we like Tebow and wish there were more athletes like him.....I like what you said about well-intended, but untimely zeal. I think that's at the heart of the issue and at the heart of Warner's point.

15. Jared - 12/03/2011 10:30 am CST

I would like someone to show me the evidence of Tebow's belief that God wants him to win. People keep saying that -- but I haven't seen a quote yet. Do we really know that he believes God is glorified in wins but not losses? Or are we just assuming that b/c we're annoyed that he is photographed praying publicly?

A guy at my solo blog said he'd prefer if Tebow glorified God and prayed when the cameras weren't on him. I assume he means "only" when the cameras aren't on him b/c otherwise, how do we know he isn't doing that too?

For my part, I think we've tried for a long time the "keep your mouth shut until somebody asks you about Jesus" approach to gospel witness and I'm not convinced it's better than the "my mouth will praise you at all times" approach.

I also keep hearing that Tebow's theology is poor and that his talk of Jesus is just empty or what-have-you. I'd like to see evidence of that as well. It seems otherwise to just be projection of assumptions prompted by annoyance. The bottom line is that even we Christians get uncomfortable when the brethren bring Jesus up too much. I include myself, shamefully, in that group, but I can't find myself to defend it.

I don't think Jesus or his gospel will get worn out or be zapped of its Spiritual power from somebody talking about them a lot or at "inopportune" moments. I know evangelism can be guided by wisdom and discernment and winsomeness, but I don't see Tebow failing at these -- I see him failing at making sure everybody's comfortable.

(Also: thanking God for a win (or a loss) is not the same as saying God cares who wins or loses. It's just "giving thanks at all times." I try to remember to thank God when good things happen too.)

Here's another good article: Anti-Tebow bias isn't about football.

16. nhe - 12/03/2011 11:04 am CST

Jared - per your comment (15) Newman said something about Tebow alluding to God caring about wins and losses - I don't agree with Newman on that at all.

I also don't think that Tebow has bad theology - seems solid to me.

Here's your statement that I'm not connecting with:

"I don't think Jesus or his gospel will get worn out or be zapped of its Spiritual power from somebody talking about them a lot or at "inopportune" moments. I know evangelism can be guided by wisdom and discernment and winsomeness, but I don't see Tebow failing at these -- I see him failing at making sure everybody's comfortable."

Can you give me an example of where non-Christians are finding Tebow's "I thank my Lord and Savior...." comments winsome? I don't see it.

I see agitation - and not only with the offense of the gospel, but also with what appears (to non-Christians) to be Tebow's off-topic answers to questions about football. As I mentioned before, its really no different than Susan Sarandon going off-topic on George Bush during her Oscar acceptance speech.

Doesn't Tebow bear some responsibility to be more discerning about when and how he shares his faith? Or are you saying that any time we thank Jesus out loud, no matter the context, its cool?

To believers - yes, we love that. But to a non-believing world, it usually doesn't come across as intended.....and again, not only because of the offense of the gospel, but also because of the "from left field" nature of the comment.

17. Jared - 12/03/2011 11:23 am CST

Or are you saying that any time we thank Jesus out loud, no matter the context, its cool?

Yeah, pretty much. I mean, I'm not saying it's mandatory to say "I want to thank Jesus first of all" in every interview or question or conversation that we each have. But I just don't see real good grounds to say Tebow should stop. It's his prerogative.

And isn't this all we're talking about? Is this the limit of the thing everyone's irked over?

and not only with the offense of the gospel, but also with what appears (to non-Christians) to be Tebow's off-topic answers to questions about football.

Like what, for instance? I'd love to see some quotes of the offending/irritating remarks. Is all we're talking about that he says "First I want to thank Jesus" when he's first asked a question after a game? Because a whole lot of athletes do that.
The main difference appears to be that a lot of people suspect Tebow actually means it. :-/

If he's ignoring direct questions to totally talk about Jesus and the gospel, I'd love to see an example of him doing that.

18. Jared - 12/03/2011 11:26 am CST

Oh, missed this:
Can you give me an example of where non-Christians are finding Tebow's "I thank my Lord and Savior...." comments winsome? I don't see it.

That's not what I was saying. I was saying that we certainly ought to factor into our evangelistic approach consideration for discernment, wisdom, and winsomeness, but I don't think those things equate to holding silent until someone becomes interested enough to ask you about Jesus.

I also would like to see where Tebow is not being winsome about Jesus. He doesn't come across to me as a virulent, soapboxer type Bible thumper. He seems very cheerful, upbeat, sensitive, etc. He just talks about Jesus a lot. I think that's what bugs people, not that he's yelling or ignoring questions.

19. nhe - 12/03/2011 11:42 am CST

Like what, for instance? I'd love to see some quotes of the offending/irritating remarks. Is all we're talking about that he says "First I want to thank Jesus" when he's first asked a question after a game? Because a whole lot of athletes do that.
The main difference appears to be that a lot of people suspect Tebow actually means it. :-/


Jake Plummer alludes to the sentiment in this interesting exchange with Tebow:

Tebow responded to Plummer last week via ESPN's First Take, saying in part: "If you're married, and you have a wife, and you really love your wife, is it good enough to only say to your wife 'I love her' the day you get married? Or should you tell her every single day when you wake up and every opportunity? And that's how I feel about my relationship with Jesus Christ is that it is the most important thing in my life. So any time I get an opportunity to tell him that I love him or given an opportunity to shout him out on national TV, I'm gonna take that opportunity."

Plummer offered a second take on that comment, too, today.

"Yeah, but even if I jumped up and after every game and said, 'First and foremost I want to thank and say I love my wife,' people would get tired of hearing that too," he said. "Even my wife would get sick of hearing that."

I think there's some truth in Plummer's words that goes beyond just offense to the gospel.

It is cool (like you said) that Tebow actually believes it......but isn't Tebow closing himself off possibly to guys like Plummer who might respond better to Tebow if the two of them met at Starbucks for coffee?

20. Bill - 12/03/2011 10:22 pm CST

Jared had a nugget in the comments thread above that I'd like to highlight, because I was thinking the exact same thing tonight on the drive home.

"or my part, I think we've tried for a long time the "keep your mouth shut until somebody asks you about Jesus" approach to gospel witness and I'm not convinced it's better than the "my mouth will praise you at all times" approach."


I agree. I am not saying the "Hey Joe, you seem to have a lot of peace in life and you have exemplary personal ethics and you seem joyful even in adversity. What's your secret?" doesn't ever happen, but I think it happens way less than most of us would like.

Another thought, and I hope I can express what I mean (lotsa luck on that, Bill) because it's what I've been on about for years here: I think most Christians (in this country at least) are embarrassed and irritated by outspoken Christians because we somehow think they're making Jesus look bad or messing up the sale or whatever. But it rarely occurs to us that the silent treatment, veiled references, modern marketing techniques and Jesus carefully wrapped in something else is not exactly advancing the Kingdom either.

People have been trying to shut Christians up for 2,000 years (often with deadly means).

21. Bill - 12/03/2011 10:32 pm CST

Ah, forgot another point I hoped to make.

Plummer make have a point, though who knows how open he'd be to the Starbucks thing. But I think it's quite a large generalization to assume that all non-Christians tune Tebow out or get itchy when he starts with the Jesus talk. Some may respect him.

And it's interesting that Tebow is being urged to keep it to himself. We live in a culture where so many have a cause and loudly trumpet it 24x7. We also trumpet our feelings about all sorts of things we care about.

As C.S. Lewis said:

“The world rings with praise – lovers praising their mistresses, readers their favorite poet, walkers praising the countryside, players praising their favorite game – praise of weather, wines, dishes, actors, motors, horses, colleges, countries, historical personages, children, flowers, mountains, rare stamps, rare beetles, even sometimes politicians or scholars. I had not noticed how the humblest, and at the same time most balanced and large minds, praised most, while the cranks, misfits and malcontents praised least.”

Yet we Christians are told to keep it to ourselves, less we embarrass our brethren and add offense to the gospel.

I too had an experience as a new Christian. I had a friend (happened to be a girl) that I "worked on" pretty hard. I was a new Christian, full of zeal, immature, and inexpert. And I offended her, hurt the relationship, and - unfortunately - "learned a lesson". I've found witnessing quite difficult since then, and I regret that I'm not more bold. I'm praying for more boldness, more opportunities and - yes - to not add any more offense to the gospel than is already there.

All that being said, Tebow doesn't strike me as an immature believer. I'm going to give him the benefit of the doubt. I'm glad the brother is bold.

22. Bill - 12/03/2011 10:52 pm CST

Me again (hope I'm not killing the thread! Wouldn't be the first time).

Interesting take from Daniel Foster - an exerpt below:

But the greater part of it has to do with the curious double standard that seems to be in place when it comes to an athlete’s religiosity. With very few exceptions — Mariano Rivera comes to mind, as well as Curt Schilling, and post-“Prime Time” Deion Sanders — athletes’ professions of faith strike most believers, nonbelievers, and agnostics alike as empty ritual, an extended solipsism in which big men with bigger egos congratulate themselves for having God on their side. How could it be otherwise? We see that in fact so many of them are supremely arrogant — materialists, abusers, and lechers. We’ve become cynical and secular enough as a society that this dissonance doesn’t bother most people. The hypocrisy is actually sort of comforting, a confirmation that that old hokum in the Bible has no bearing on the world as it actually is. It’s the same sort of glee you see from some when Christian politicians and ministers are felled by all-too-human moral — especially sexual — foibles.

By contrast, Tebow is the last Boy Scout. A leader on the field and off who spent his college years not indulging in any of the worldly pleasures afforded to Heisman Trophy winners, but doing missionary work in Thailand; helping overworked doctors perform circumcisions in the Philippines (you read that right); and preaching at schools, churches, and even prisons. This is a young man with such a strong work ethic that, according to teammates, he can’t even be coaxed into hitting the town on a night after a Broncos win, because he is too busy preparing for the next week’s game. This is a young man who even turned the other cheek at Stephen Tulloch’s Tebowing, saying, “He was probably just having fun and was excited he made a good play and had a sack. And good for him.”

That’s way too much earnestness for the ironic. It’s way too much idealism for the cynical. And it’s way too much selflessness for the self-absorbed. In short, people aren’t upset at Tebow’s God talk. They’re upset that he might actually believe it.

23. Scott - 12/04/2011 3:04 pm CST

I like the way Tebow is witnessing a lot better than many Christians are not witnessing.

24. Rich - 12/04/2011 4:22 pm CST

I've seen Warner getting quite a bit of criticism about this interview, but I think he's getting a bit of a bad rap. Warner is not your average quoter of the "if necessary, use words" cliche. He's been where Tebow is and he's done what Tebow is doing, and, as it was put in the interview, "But after a while, he sensed the audience tuning him out. His form of evangelizing was turning counterproductive."

I remember reading an interview with Warner after he joined the Cardinals. He talked about how difficult it was for him to forge relationships with his teammates because of his earlier boldness his first couple of seasons in the league. Teammates wouldn't want to spend time with him, get to know him, accept invitations to his home, etc., because they thought he was holier than thou and they didn't want to be around him. It frustrated him because he wanted to make those relationships, not only because it would make him a better team leader, but also because it allowed him to share Jesus--by word and action--with them. Essentially, his earlier boldness had alienated his mission field. I think his comments to Tebow are from a desire for Tebow to be a more effective witness (including a verbal witness) for a career and lifetime.

I'm not necessarily saying Warner's right and Tebow's wrong. And I find myself pulling for Tebow--which is unnatural for me as a Chiefs fan--because of the boldness and apparent genuineness of his love for Jesus. But I'm not about to fault Warner for speaking from his experience--maybe the only person around who has experienced pretty much exactly what Tebow has experienced--as to what Tebow's approach actually means for the gospel. Warner's experience makes me think he's hoping to help shape Tebow into an effective witness for Christ to the lost in NFL locker rooms for a career, instead of just being a poster boy for football-loving evangelicals today.

25. Brad Young - 12/04/2011 10:07 pm CST

First I'll lay my cards down, I am an evangelist, I open air preach, hand out tracts, talked with people on the street, in my family, at college, at work. Evangelism is not difficult, I'll even share the secret: be in the word, be in prayer, study and open your mouth. That's it. A lot of what's listed here is the same excuses I hear, and the same excuses I used for too many years. If you want to be better at sharing your faith, then start sharing your faith! Next time the Holy Spirit lays it on your heart to ask someone if they believe in God, or Jesus or whatever the word he gives you... DO IT, and then start praying that he'll provide the next sentence.

If you share your faith enough, your are going to get burned, but the increase is not up to you, so get over yourself. Remember the farmer scatters seed, and then goes to sleep, and GOD grows the crops. Just 'cause you got burned doesn't mean it wasn't effective, you opened your mouth and were faithful, leave it with Jesus, trust him. His word does not come back empty but completes the work it was sent out to do. Just because you don't seem an instant salvation, doesn't mean it wasn't effective. Also remember, the same sun that melts the ice also hardens the clay.

Tebow seems to gets this, you just keep throwing seed every chance the Lord gives you, every audience, every time. Some will get fed up, some will turn away, maybe the guys in the locker room won't go out for coffee with him, but they HEARD the message. "and how will they call on him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone preaching?" Romans 10:14 We as believers are called to be a faithful witness, that's all, the Lord does with that witness what he wants to save his elect. Scatter seed, and go to bed.

Or you know he could not say anything about Jesus, try and build friendships, wait for people to have some crippling life event then tell people about the Jesus he never talks about, or worse yet invest so much time in the friendship that he's too afraid to lose it and never says a word because its more comfortable.

I say the man knows why the Lord has placed him in this position, and has laid on his heart how he is to respond, let him be faithful, the world is already trying to knock him down, the last thing he needs is this fellow brothers in the Lord helping them.

And, because I can't help myself, lay off the "Tebowing" thing. The guy was kneeling and praying, and it happened to be recorded. He didn't run out on the field and strike a pose, he has a few minutes to himself and he kneels and prays, so what. Humbly bowing down before the Lord and seeking him does not compare to the pharisees and their seeking mans approval with elaborate prayers and a holier than thou persona.

26. G. Frederick - 12/05/2011 9:56 am CST

Maybe it was difficult for Warner to "forge relationships" after many years of "preaching" but I would be willing to bet (and this from personal experience) that those same people who wouldn't want to spend time with him, get to know him, accept invitations to his home, etc., because they thought he was holier than thou and they didn't want to be around him" would be the first to call on him in their times of trouble. This to me, if true, would indicate that Warner (and Tebow) were very effective in ministry and witness; they just wouldn't see it in every day "relationships" which is what we want but not necessarily what the HS wants.

27. G. Frederick - 12/05/2011 9:57 am CST

Maybe it was difficult for Warner to "forge relationships" after many years of "preaching" but I would be willing to bet (and this from personal experience) that those same people who wouldn't want to spend time with him, get to know him, accept invitations to his home, etc., because they thought he was holier than thou and they didn't want to be around him" would be the first to call on him in their times of trouble. This to me, if true, would indicate that Warner (and Tebow) were very effective in ministry and witness; they just wouldn't see it in every day "relationships" which is what we want but not necessarily what the HS wants.

28. Mick - 12/12/2011 6:59 pm CST

Go Tim! He appears to be led by the Spirit, speaking Truth, and giving praise. That should leave the rest of us with one response let's join together in prayer for him to use the platform he's been given to do what God wants him to do. "Lord, give Tim Tebow your wisdom and your Word to speak much needed Truth into our culture that so obviously needs it".

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